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Kindling 4 pp 93-112 | Cite as

Forebrain and Brainstem Mechanisms Governing Kindled Seizure Development: A Hypothesis

  • James L. Burchfiel
  • Craig D. Applegate
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 37)

Abstract

What is the nature of the kindling process? “Kindling” was coined by Goddard and his colleagues [20] to describe an observed phenomenon — the progressively increasing seizure generalization seen with repeated, temporally spaced stimulations of certain brain structures. From this phenomenological point of view, kindling is well named, since it appears to be a self-perpetuating process which once started continues inexorably to completion.

Keywords

Middle Phase Seizure Generalization Seizure Development Dominant Site Midbrain Reticular Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • James L. Burchfiel
    • 1
  • Craig D. Applegate
    • 1
  1. 1.Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Department of NeurologyUniversity of Rochester School of MedicineRochesterUSA

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