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Dietary Fiber and Bile Acid Metabolism

  • Jon A. Story
  • Julia J. Watterson
  • Hugh B. Matheson
  • Emily J. Furumoto
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 270)

Abstract

Physical properties possessed by dietary fiber suggest several ways in which interactions of dietary fiber and bile acids might result in alterations of bile acid metabolism which would influence sterol balance, a major determinant of serum cholesterol which, an important risk factor for coronary heart disease. The first property of interest is the ability of some sources of dietary fiber to absorb water, diluting the contents of the intestine, or to form gels which hold water and may interfere with mixing or transport within the intestine. Second, some sources of dietary fiber interact with organic compounds (e.g. bile acids) or with ions, binding or adsorbing them and potentially interfering with their absorption from the intestine. Fermentability of some source of dietary fiber may also contribute to their effects through changes in the environment within the intestine or through absorption of metabolites which may have secondary effects in the liver or at other sites.

Keywords

Bile Acid Bile Salt Dietary Fiber Chenodeoxycholic Acid Bile Acid Metabolism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jon A. Story
    • 1
  • Julia J. Watterson
    • 1
  • Hugh B. Matheson
    • 1
  • Emily J. Furumoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Foods and NutritionPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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