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Analysis of Foodstuffs for Dietary Fiber by the Urea Enzymatic Dialysis Method

  • Joseph L. Jeraci
  • Betty A. Lewis
  • James B. Robertson
  • Peter J. Van Soest
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 270)

Abstract

Total dietary fiber (TDF) values for cereal grains, fruits, vegetables, processed foods, and purified or semi-purified dietary fiber products were determined by a new method using 8M urea and enzymes (urea enzymatic dialysis, UED, method). The results are compared with the official AOAC procedure. Soluble and insoluble dietary fiber were determined for several of these foodstuffs and compared with the NDF values. Crude protein and ash contamination was usually lower with the UED method compared with the AOAC method, particulary for samples that formed gels during ethanol precipitation. Urea and the heat stable amylase were effective in removing starch even at relatively low temperatures of the assay (50°C). The new assay is relatively economical in use of equipment, enzymes, and reagents. Studies are currently in progress to minimize the assay time for the UED method while further improving its flexibility and robustness. The results of the studies will be discussed.

Keywords

Crude Protein Dietary Fiber Neutral Detergent Fiber Resistant Starch Dialysis Tube 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph L. Jeraci
    • 1
  • Betty A. Lewis
    • 1
  • James B. Robertson
    • 1
  • Peter J. Van Soest
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Nutritional Sciences, Savage HallCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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