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Dietary Fiber: A Glance into the Future

  • David Kritchevsky
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 270)

Abstract

The idea of physiological benefits deriving from dietary fiber is not new. Burkitt (1986) has reviewed the genesis of what we now call the dietary fiber hypothesis going back to Hippocrates and citing workers in the 19th and early 20th centuries who contributed to the progress in the field. However, until the middle 1950’s most studies of or allusions to fiber were concerned primarily with its laxative properties. Surgeon-Captain T. L. Cleave (1956) pointed out the overall metabolic role(s) of diets low or high in complex carbohydrates. His work influenced the later observations of Burkitt and Trowell whose writings, together with those of A.R.P. Walker laid the groundwork for the modern phase of this developing field. The popular fiber era in the United States was ushered in by the paper by Burkitt, Walker and Painter (1974) which pointed out differences in health conditions between the United States and Africa and showed where fiber intake might impinge upon these differences. Whereas a number of investigators had been concerned with effects of dietary fiber before 1974, the Burkitt, Walker and Painter paper brought dietary fiber to the attention of lay and professional audiences.

Keywords

Dietary Fiber Short Chain Fatty Acid Fiber Intake Total Dietary Fiber Apply Science Publisher 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Kritchevsky
    • 1
  1. 1.The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and BiologyPhiladelphiaUSA

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