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A Finite Element Test Bed for Diffraction Tomography

  • Z. You
  • W. Lord
Chapter
Part of the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation book series

Abstract

Finite element analysis methods have been successfully applied to the study of ultrasonic wave propagation in elastic solids [1–4]. As a natural part of such numerical solutions. displacements are predicted for every node of the spatial discretization describing the solids geometry and at every instant of time in the temporal discretization used to define the pulse propagation through the material. All of the data constitute a solution to the forward problem and can be used to visualize wavefront propagation and interactions with defects, thus predicting displacement signals at any point in or on the solid.

Keywords

Transmission Mode Reflection Mode Forward Problem Finite Element Analysis Method Diffraction Tomography 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z. You
    • 1
  • W. Lord
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer EngineeringIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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