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Non-Destructive Evaluation Measurement Technology for Polymer Processing Based on Fluorescence Spectroscopy

  • A. J. Bur
  • R. E. Lowry
  • F. W. Wang
  • S. C. Roth
  • C. L. Thomas
Chapter
Part of the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation book series

Abstract

We are employing fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool to monitor polymer processing parameters which are important for understanding process behavior. The measurements involve the detection of fluorescence spectra from fluorescent dyes which have been doped into the processed polymer material. The character of the fluorescence, i.e. its intensity, polarization, and wavelength distribution, yields information about the state of the polymer matrix. We have concentrated on developing concepts and methods to measure molecular orientation, shear stress, shear rate, non-Newtonian viscosity, velocity, residence time distribution, flow instabilities, quality-of-mix of ingredients, and intersegmental mixing. Work on each of these measurement problems is ongoing and in various stages of development.1-2 In this paper, we describe some recent work on quality-of-mix and intersegmental mixing.

Keywords

Fluorescence Spectrum Critical Shear Stress Residence Time Distribution Normalize Fluorescence Intensity Optical Fiber Bundle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    A. J. Bur, J. Shibata, T. K. Trout, F. W. Wang, and C. L. Thomas, J. Poly. Eng. and Sci., to be published.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    In-Situ Fluorescence Monitoring of the Viscosities of Particle Filled Polymers in Flow“, A. J. Bur, A. Lee, F. W. Wang, R. E. Lowry, S. C. Roth, and T. K. Trout, National Institute of Standards and Technology Internal Report, NISTIR 88–3892, November, 1988.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    G. Matthews, Polymer Mixing Technology, Applied Science Publishers, New York, NY, 1982.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Mixing Theory and Practice, Vol. III, Edited by V. W. Uhl and J. B. Gray, Academic Press, Harcourt Brace Javanovich Publishers, New York, NY, 1986.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Identification of a commercial product is made only to describe experimental procedures and to facilitate experimental reproducibility. In no case does such identification imply NIST recommendation or endorsement nor does it imply that the item identified is necessarily the best available for the purpose.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Bur
    • 1
  • R. E. Lowry
    • 1
  • F. W. Wang
    • 1
  • S. C. Roth
    • 1
  • C. L. Thomas
    • 1
  1. 1.Polymers DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA

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