Advertisement

Nondestructive Methods for the Determination of Mechanical Properties of Materials

  • L. J. H. Brasche
  • D. C. Jiles
  • O. Buck
  • S. Hariharan
Chapter
Part of the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation book series

Abstract

The nondestructive determination of mechanical properties of materials is desirable because of the rising cost of both materials and labor as well as safety concerns. In most alloys, changes in thermal and/or mechanical history results in microstructural changes and consequently different mechanical properties. Thermal or mechanical cycles may result from processing or occur in service. Therefore nondestructive detection of microstructure and mechanical properties would prove useful in all phases of metallurgical use. This paper reports on efforts to determine selected mechanical properties of structural materials by nondestructive means such as electrical, acoustic and magnetic techniques as well as hardness. Various thermal and mechanical conditions have been imposed on aluminum, titanium and ferrous alloys to arrive at a wide range of mechanical properties. It is concluded that the intimate knowledge of the microstructure and environmental effects are essential to select the nondestructive method that is most sensitive to property changes.

Keywords

Fatigue Life Strain Amplitude Ferrous Alloy Fatigue Crack Propagation Rate Eutectic Melting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    THE authors appreciate several pieces of AL 2090 received courtesy of R.J. Bucci and R. Westerland of Alcoa.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    D.J. Bracci, R. Garikepati, D.C. Jiles and O. Buck, In D.O. Thompson and D.E. Chimenti (eds.), Review of Progress in Quantitative NDE, Vol. 6B, Plenum, New York, 1987, p. 1395.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    D.J. Bracci, R. Garikepati, D.C. Jiles and O. Buck, In D.O. Thompson and D.E. Chimenti (eds.), Review of Progress in Quantitative NDE, Vol. 7B, Plenum, New York, 1988, p. 1255.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    L.J.H. Brasche, O. Buck, D.C. Jiles J.D. Snodgrass and D.J. Bracci, In D.O. Thompson and D.E. Chimenti (eds.), Review of Progress in Quantitative NDE, Vol. 8B, Plenum, New York, 1989, p. 1717.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    O. Buck, L.J.H. Brasche, J.E. Shield, D.J. Bracci, D.C. Jiles and L.S. Chumbley, Scripta Met., 23, 183, (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    L.J.H. Brasche, D.J. Bracci, D.C. Jiles and O. Buck, Materials Science and Engineering, in press.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    J.R. Cahoon, W.H. Broughton and A.R. Kutzak, Metall. Trans., 2, 1979, 1971 ).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    R.A. Chihoski, Met. Prog., 5, 27, (1983).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    B. Noble, S.J. Harris, and K. Dinsdale, J. Mater. Sci. 17, 461, (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    S. Razvi, P. Li, K. Salama, J.H. Cantrell, Jr. and W.T. Yost,. Wo shi wang mei. In D.O. Thompson and D.E. Chimenti (eds.), Review of Progress in Quantitative NDE, Vol. 6B, Plenum, New York, 1987, p. 1403.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    M.R. James, Scripta Met., 21, 783, (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    M.J. Donachie, Jr., Titanium and Titanium Alloys, American Society for Metals, Metals Park, Ohio (1982).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    R.E. Lewis, J.G. Bjeletich, T.M. Morton and F. A. Crossley, Cracks and Fracture, 371, (1976).Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Heat Treating, Metals Handbook, 9th ed., 4, American Society for Metals, Metals Park, Ohio (1981).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. J. H. Brasche
    • 1
  • D. C. Jiles
    • 1
  • O. Buck
    • 1
  • S. Hariharan
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for NDEIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

Personalised recommendations