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Ultrasonic Characterization of Porosity in Composites

  • B. T. Smith
Chapter
Part of the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation book series

Abstract

The determination of levels of porosity is important in the engineering uses of graphite fiber/polymer matrix composites, since the interlaminar shear strength can be greatly reduced by excessive porosity [1]. Research in making nondestructive evaluations using ultrasonics as the probing energy has taken many directions. Hsu [2] has successfully modeled the frequency dependent attenuation to predict porosity levels in composites. Kline [3] has extended the work of Hashsin and Rosen [4] to determine the porosity and fiber volume fraction of composites by solving for the elastic coefficients of the composite structure. The propagation of leaky Lamb waves [5] has also been used to model porosity levels.

Keywords

Fiber Volume Fraction Carbon Sphere Porosity Level Relative Attenuation Backscatter Signal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. T. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsChristopher Newport CollegeNewport NewsUSA

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