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Characterization of the Texture of Heavily Deformed Metal-Metal Composites with Acoustic Microscopy

  • R. B. Thompson
  • Y. Li
  • W. A. Spitzig
  • G. A. D. Briggs
  • A. Fagan
  • J. Kushibiki
Chapter
Part of the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation book series

Abstract

Composite materials are playing an increasingly important role as structural components. Familiar motivations for their use include the ability to achieve high ratios of strength to weight, tailored elastic stiffnesses, damage tolerance, etc. A new class of these materials which has recently received considerable attention for structural applications is the heavily deformed metal-metal composites1,2. Through extensive deformation processing of two ductile components, e.g. Nb dendrites in a Cu matrix, a fine, highly aligned, reinforced structure is produced. These heavily deformed metal-metal composites have been found to exhibit large mechanical strength in combination with high thermal and electrical conductivities at elevated temperatures3,4. In attempting to understand the mechanisms leading to these superior properties, an experimental determination of the microstructure developed during the deformation processing was undertaken. One aspect is the texture, or preferred grain orientation, developed during the deformation.

Keywords

Rayleigh Wave Draw Ratio Copper Matrix Acoustic Microscope Scan Acoustic Microscopy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. B. Thompson
    • 1
  • Y. Li
    • 1
  • W. A. Spitzig
    • 1
  • G. A. D. Briggs
    • 2
  • A. Fagan
    • 2
  • J. Kushibiki
    • 3
  1. 1.Ames Laboratory and College of EngineeringIowa State UniversityAmesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Metallurgy and Science of MaterialsOxford UniversityOxfordEngland
  3. 3.College of EngineeringTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan

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