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Modeling Inspectability for an Automated Eddy Current Measurement System

  • N. Nakagawa
  • M. W. Kubovich
  • J. C. Moulder
Chapter
Part of the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation book series

Abstract

We have developed an automated eddy current measurement system in our laboratory for quantitative nondestructive evaluation applications. The heart of the measurement system is a precision impedance analyzer capable of measuring impedance or any impedance related quantity over a wide range in frequency (102–108 Hz). Data acquisition, processing, analysis, and display is accomplished with a personal computer. Computer-controlled x-y positioning stages permit measurements to be obtained for either one- or two-dimensional scans of the specimen. In this article we describe the measurement system and give examples of its use to measure flaw signals with a uniform-field eddy current probe [1].

Keywords

Flaw Signal Relative Operating Characteristic Eddy Current Test Precision Impedance Analyzer Eddy Current Probe 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Nakagawa
    • 1
  • M. W. Kubovich
    • 1
  • J. C. Moulder
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for NDEIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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