Advertisement

Determination of the Elastic Constants of Composites Through the Inversion of Leaky Lamb Wave Data

  • M. R. Karim
  • A. K. Mal
  • Y. Bar-Cohen
Chapter
Part of the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation book series

Abstract

Analysis and prediction of the response of composite laminates to external loads are essential for the design of composite structures. This in turn requires a precise knowledge of their mechanical properties including their constitutive behavior. It is reasonable to assume that, in the bulk, the overall behavior of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites is the same as that of a homogeneous, transversely isotropic material with its symmetry axis along the fiber direction. Then the linear elastic response of the material can be described by means of five elastic constants. If the values of these constants can be determined, then the stress analysis of a laminate with a given number and stacking order of the laminae can, in principle, be carried out. However, the measurement of the elastic constants by conventional, destructive techniques is difficult and often, inaccurate. Thus, the availability of alternative, preferably nondestructive methods, for the determination of the elastic costants of the material would be extremely helpful.

Keywords

Reflection Coefficient Dispersion Curve Lamb Wave Interface Zone Dispersion Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    A.K. Mal, Wave Motion, 10, 257–266 (1988).CrossRefMATHGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    A.H. Nayfey, T.W. Taylor and D. E. Chimenti, Proc. ASME Symposium on Wave Propagation in Structural Composites, A.K. Mal and T.C.T Ting, (eds.) ASME-AMD-Vol. 90,17–27 (1988).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    A.K. Mal and Y. Bar-Cohen, Proc. ASME Symposium on Wave Propagation in Structural Composites, ibid 1–16 (1988).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J.A. Nedler and R. Mead, Computer Journal, 7, 308–315 (1965).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    M.S. Caceci and W.P. Cacheris, Byte, 9, No. 5, 339–360 (1984).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    A.K. Mal and Y. Bar-Cohen, Rev. Pogrs. QNDE, D.L. Thompson and D.E. Chimenti, (eds.), Vol. 8B, 1551–1558 (1988).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    A.K. Mal and Y. Bar-Cohen, Proc. Fourth Japan–U.S. Conf. on Composite Materials, Washington D. C., June 27–29, 361–370 (1988).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    J.L. Rose and A. Pilarski, Proc. ASME Symposium on Wave Propagation in Structural Composites, ibid, 117–132 (1988).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    B. Tang and E.G. Henneke,II, Material Evaluation, 47, 928–934 (1989).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    S.J. Rokhlin and D.E. Chimenti, Rev. Progr. QNDE, Maine, July (1989).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    V.K. Kinra and V. Dayal, Rev. Progr. QNDE, Maine, July (1989).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. R. Karim
    • 1
  • A. K. Mal
    • 1
  • Y. Bar-Cohen
    • 2
  1. 1.Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering DepartmentUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Douglas Aircraft CompanyMcDonnell Douglas CorporationLong BeachUSA

Personalised recommendations