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Novel High-Frequency Air Transducers

  • S. Schiller
  • C-K. Hsieh
  • C-H. Chou
  • B. T. Khuri-Yakub
Chapter
Part of the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation book series

Abstract

Ultrasonic transducers operating in air in the frequency range of 1–10MHz have major applications in robotics and nondestructive evaluation. For robotics applications, high-frequency air transducers make possible range measurements with a resolution in the 30–100 μm range. For nondestructive evaluation, it is possible to make transmission C-scan systems operating in air for the inspection of composites, green ceramics, and even metals at elevated temperatures. In this work, we report on the use of ligneous materials as a matching layer for PZT-based transducers.

Keywords

Nondestructive Evaluation Insertion Loss Silica Aerogel Ultrasonic Transducer Robotic Application 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    B. T. Khuri-Yakub, J. H. Kim, C-H Chou, P. Parent, and G. S. Kino, “A New Design for Air Transducers,” Proc. IEEE Ultrasonics Symp., 503–506 (1988).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    T. Yano, M. Yone, and A. Fukomoto, “1 MHz Ultrasonic Transducer Operating in Air,” Acoustical Imaging 14 (1985).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Aerogels: Proceedings of the First International Symposium, Wurzburg, F. R.G. September 23–25, 1985. Edited by J. Fricke, Springer Proceedings in Physics 6 (1986).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Schiller
    • 1
  • C-K. Hsieh
    • 1
  • C-H. Chou
    • 1
  • B. T. Khuri-Yakub
    • 1
  1. 1.Ginzton Laboratory, W. W. Hansen Laboratories of PhysicsStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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