Seeing with Light, Sound, Microwaves, X-Rays, Gamma Rays, Etc.

  • Glen Wade
Part of the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation book series


It is common to regard humans as being able to see only with light, but about a hundred years ago at the beginning of the modern era, along came x-rays and sonograms. By now technology has made it possible for us to see in a great many different ways. Important views such as underground pools of oil, tumors in the brain, fine structure in the rings of Saturn, ship wreckage on the bottom of the ocean, cracks in the ice packs of the Arctic, all these views and many more, completely unperceivable one hundred years ago, are available to us now with our technology in astonishing clarity and detail.


Synthetic Aperture Radar Mental Image Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Scan Tunneling Microscope Image Acoustic Image 


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  1. 1.
    E. E. Aldridge, A. B. Clare, D. A. Sheppard, “Ultrasonic Holography and Non-Destructive Testing,” in Acoustical Holography, Vol. 3, chap. 7, A. F. Metherell, Ed., New York: Plenum Press, 1971.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. S. Green, L. F. Schaefer, and A. Makovski, “Considerations for Diagnostic Ultrasonic Imaging,” in Acoustical Holography, Vol. 4, pp. 97, G. Wade, Ed., New York: Plenum Press, 1972.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    P. S. Green, L. F. Schaefer, E. D. Jones and J. R. Suarez, “A New, High-Performance Ultrasonics Camera,” in Acoustical Holography, Vol. 5, pp. 493–503, P. S. Green, Ed., New York: Plenum Press, 1974.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glen Wade
    • 1
  1. 1.Electrical and Computer Engineering DepartmentUniversity of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA

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