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Intracellular Messengers Associated with Excitatory Amino Acid (EAA) Receptors

  • Joël Bockaert
  • Aline Dumuis
  • Olivier Manzoni
  • Joël Nargeot
  • Kiyoshi Oomagari
  • Jean-Philippe Pin
  • Franςois Rassendren
  • Michèle Sebben
  • Fritz Sladeczek
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 268)

Abstract

Glutamate (Glu) and L-aspartate (Asp) have now been recognized as the two main excitatory neurotransmitters in vertebrate brain. In addition, to allow the fast excitatory neurotransmission, these amino acids appear to play crucial roles in neuronal plasticity. These include changes in neuronal development (Barnes, 1986; Balàzs et al., 1988; Didier et al., 1989), as well as changes in synaptic efficacy, which probably underlie learning and memory (Nicoll et al., 1988). In addition, they are likely to be implicated in neuronal death, associated with several neurological diseases including strokes, hypoglycemia, epilepsy and Huntington’s chorea.

Keywords

Arachidonic Acid NMDA Receptor Xenopus Oocyte Excitatory Amino Acid Cerebellar Granule Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joël Bockaert
    • 1
  • Aline Dumuis
    • 1
  • Olivier Manzoni
    • 1
  • Joël Nargeot
    • 2
  • Kiyoshi Oomagari
    • 1
  • Jean-Philippe Pin
    • 1
  • Franςois Rassendren
    • 2
  • Michèle Sebben
    • 1
  • Fritz Sladeczek
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre CNRS-INSERM de Pharmacologie-EndocrinologieMontpellier Cedex 2France
  2. 2.CNRS — CRBM, UPR 41, INSERM U. 249Montpellier CedexFrance

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