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Whole Body Hyperthermia Experience in Breast Cancer at American International Hospital

  • Robert D. Levin
  • Ranulfo Sanchez
  • Young Doo Kim
  • Alfonso Mellijor
  • Mary Ann Doyle
  • William Simonich
  • R. Michael Williams
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 267)

Abstract

One hundred thirty nine patients with metastatic breast cancer were seen at American International Hospital during the years 1982–86. Forty two evaluable patients received whole body hyperthermia (WBH) via the the heated water blanket technique of Barlogie et all and of Larkin et al2 with chemotherapy. Our 1985 research protocol outlined a plan of initial chemotherapy for up to two months, with WBH added in poor responders. We attempted to achieve a core body temperatures of 42.2° C for two hours. Chemotherapy began 18 hours after completion of WBH. This was done to utilize WBH under optimum conditions, and to gain experience with a wide range of chemotherapy drugs, each given in combinations and doses chosen to be optimum for patient care independant of WBH. These studies were primarily intended to evaluate the safety of both forms of therapy given sequentially.

Keywords

Metastatic Breast Cancer Poor Responder Visceral Metastasis Initial Chemotherapy Prior Chemotherapy Regimen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    B. Barlogie, P. M. Corry, E. Yip, et al, Total Body Hyperthermia with and without Chemotherapy for Advanced Human Neoplasms, Cancer Res. 39: 1481 (1979).PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    J. M. Larkin, W. S. Edwards, D. E. Smith, and P. J. Clark. Systemic Thermotherapy: Description of a Method and Physiologic Tolerance in Clinical Subjects, Cancer 48: 3155 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert D. Levin
    • 1
  • Ranulfo Sanchez
    • 1
  • Young Doo Kim
    • 1
  • Alfonso Mellijor
    • 1
  • Mary Ann Doyle
    • 1
  • William Simonich
    • 1
  • R. Michael Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.American International HospitalZionUSA

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