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Plant Aging pp 367-371 | Cite as

Cuticle Development in Dianthus Caryophyllus Plantlets

  • M. A. Fal
  • P. Bernad
  • R. Obeso
  • R. Sánchez Tamés
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 186)

Abstract

Cuticle development on “in vitro” developed leaves is important in order to prevent excessive water loss during acclimatization of “in vitro” micropropagated plants. Therefore quantitative and qualitative content of epicuticular wax on leaves of Dianthus caryophyllus has been studied from the “in vitro” juvenile stage to adult plants acclimatized and grown in greenhouse conditions.

The results show there are different cuticles all through their development. Thus “in vitro” developed leaves have less epicuticular wax than adult, greenhouse adapted plants, and the chemical composition was also different after acclimatization.

Keywords

Compound Class Cuticular Transpiration Irreversible Tissue Damage Excessive Water Loss Cuticle Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Fal
    • 1
  • P. Bernad
    • 2
  • R. Obeso
    • 2
  • R. Sánchez Tamés
    • 1
  1. 1.Lab. Fisiología Vegetal, Dpt. B.O.S.Univ. OviedoOviedoSpain
  2. 2.Dpt. Química OrganometálicaUniv. OviedoSpain

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