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Plant Aging pp 351-355 | Cite as

Age and Meristem “in Vitro” Culture Behaviour in Filbert

  • Ma. T. Fernández
  • M. Rey
  • C. Díaz-Sala
  • R. Rodríguez
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 186)

Abstract

One of the most important problems for vegetative propagation of tree species, is associated with slow growth, also with changes between the juvenile and adult state, and the gradual loss of morphogenetic capacity (Libby, 1974).

Keywords

Gibberellic Acid Callus Induction Adult Plant Ascorbic Acid Oxidase Basal Callus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ma. T. Fernández
    • 1
  • M. Rey
    • 1
  • C. Díaz-Sala
    • 1
  • R. Rodríguez
    • 1
  1. 1.Cátedra de Fisiología Vegetal. Fac. de BiologíaUniversidad de OviedoSpain

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