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Plant Aging pp 191-197 | Cite as

Organogenesis: Structural, Physiological and Biochemical Aspects

  • Trevor A. Thorpe
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 186)

Abstract

The process of de novo organogenesis in cultured tissues is a complex one, in which extrinsic and intrinsic factors play a role (Thorpe, 1980, 1988). Organized development can be regulated through manipulation of the culture medium and the culture environment, and by judicious selection of the inoculum. Manipulation of these factors allows cells that are quiescent or committed only to cell division to undergo a transition, which at the molecular level involves selective gene activation. This activity is reflected by biochemical, biophysical, and physiological changes, which lead to structural organization within the cultured tissues. Much is known about the manipulation of the factors regulating de novo organogenesis (Thorpe, 1980; Evans et al., 1981), but virtually nothing is known about regulation at the molecular level (Brown and Thorpe, 1986; Thorpe, 1988). Even less information is available on the process in woody plants. Understanding de novo organogenesis is not only of interest to developmental morphologists and plant physiologists, but also to those involved in the exploitation of tissue culture technology for plant improvement because regeneration of plantlets is central to this activity. Regeneration of plantlets in vitro is most commonly achieved via organogenesis in a procedure requiring several distinct stages (see Thorpe and Harry, this volume). In general, shoot-bud induction and shoot primordium formation are the first stages in plant regeneration.

Keywords

Adventitious Shoot Meristematic Tissue Benzyl Adenine Shoot Initiation Tissue Culture Technology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Trevor A. Thorpe
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Physiology Research Group, Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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