Plant Aging pp 113-116 | Cite as

Recovery of Somatic Variation in Resistance of Populus to Septoria Musiva

  • M. E. Ostry
  • D. D. Skilling
  • O. Y. Lee-Stadelmann
  • W. P. Hackett
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 186)

Abstract

Tissue culture has been used primarily to clonally propagate plants. However, genetic variation has been observed among regenerated plants. Passage of plant cells through a tissue culture cycle can result in increased spontaneous phenotypic and genetic variation. Somaclonal variation is the term used to describe variation exhibited by plants obtained from aseptic culture (Larkin and Scowcroft, 1981). Somatic variation is now considered a general phenomenon and somaclonal variation in disease resistance has been observed in many agronomic crops (Larkin, 1987).

Keywords

Biomass Sucrose Agar Poplar Lester 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature

  1. Evans, D.A., and Sharp, W.R., 1983, Single gene mutations in tomato plants regenerated from tissue culture. Science, 221:949–951.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Evans, D.A. and Sharp, W.R., 1986, Applications of somaclonal variation, Bio/Technology. 4:528–532.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Larkin, P.J., and Scowcroft, W.R., 1981, Somaclonal variation — a novel source of variability from cell cultures for plant improvement, Thoer. Appl. Genet., 60:197–214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Larkin, P.J., 1987, Somaclonal variation: history, method, and meaning, Iowa State Journal of Research. 61:393–434.Google Scholar
  5. Lee-Stadelmann, O.Y., Lee, S.W., Hackett, W.P., and Read, P.E., 1989, The formation of adventitious buds in vitro on micro-crossections of hybrid Populus midveins, Plant Sci. 61:263–272.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Lester, D.T., and Berbee, J.G., 1977, Within-clone variation among black poplar trees derived from callus culture, Forest Sci., 23:122–131.Google Scholar
  7. Lloyd, G., and McCown, B., 1980, Commercially-feasible micropropagation of mountain laurel, Kalmia latifolia, by use of shoot tip culture, Proc. Inter. Soc. Plant Prop., 30:421–427.Google Scholar
  8. Lorz, H., 1984, Variability in tissue culture derived plants, Pages 103–114, in: “Genetic Manipulation: Impact on Man and Society”, W. Arber, ed., Cambridge Univ. Press, 250 pp.Google Scholar
  9. Meins, F., Jr., 1983, Heritable variation in plant cell culture, Ann Rev. Physiol. 32:327–346.Google Scholar
  10. Ostry, M.E., and Skilling, D.D., 1988, Somatic variation in resistance of Populus to Septoria musiva. Plant Disease. 72:724–727.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Ostry, M.E., and McNabb, H.S., Jr., 1986, Populus species and hybrid clones resistant to Melampsora. Marssonina. and Septoria. Res. Pap. NC-272, St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station, 7 p.Google Scholar
  12. Ostry, M.E., McRoberts, R.E., Ward, K.T., and Resendez, R., Screening hybrid poplars in vitro for resistance to leaf spot caused by S. musiva. Plant Disease. 72:497–499.Google Scholar
  13. Scowcroft, W.R., and Larkin, P.J., 1983, Somaclonal variation, cell selection and genotype improvement, Pages 153–168. in: “Comprehensive Biotechnology”, Vol. 3. C.W. Robinson, and H.J. Howell, eds., Pergamon Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  14. Spiers, A.G., 1978, An agar leaf-disc technique for screening poplars for resistance to Marssonina. Plant Dis. Rep., 62:144–147.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. E. Ostry
    • 1
  • D. D. Skilling
    • 1
  • O. Y. Lee-Stadelmann
    • 2
  • W. P. Hackett
    • 2
  1. 1.North Central Forest Experiment StationU.S. Dept. of AgricultureUSA
  2. 2.Dept. of Horticultural ScienceUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA

Personalised recommendations