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Plant Aging pp 81-87 | Cite as

Effective Handling of Plant Tissue Culture

  • R. Sánchez Tamés
  • B. Fernandez Muñiz
  • J. P. Majada
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 186)

Abstract

Since in vitro cell, organ and tissue culture have become widespread tools in the study of plant differentiation, and in its practical application to the production of great numbers of plants, it is convenient to consider the possibilities of these techniques for the improvement of the procedures amenable to these endings.

Keywords

Plant Tissue Culture Plant Cell Tissue Organ Culture High Photosynthetic Photon Flux Automate Plant Commercial Micropropagation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Sánchez Tamés
    • 1
  • B. Fernandez Muñiz
    • 1
  • J. P. Majada
    • 1
  1. 1.Lab. Fisiología Vegetal, Departamento de Biología de Organismos y SistemasUniversidad de OviedoOviedoSpain

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