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The Practical Use of Artificial Intelligence in Automated Tutoring: Current Status and Impediments to Progress

  • Gordon I. McCalla
  • Jim E. Greer

Abstract

The use of computer assisted instruction (CAI) has become increasingly common in educational settings ranging from preschool through college. Advances in artificial intelligence (AI), including improved capabilities for representation, organization, and application of knowledge, have simultaneously occurred. Intelligent CAI (ICAI), which addresses the problem of automating the teaching process, represents a relatively new and rapidly expanding area of artificial intelligence research. This paper focusses on the practicality of constructing knowledgeable and responsive intelligent computer assisted instruction by describing necessary components, useful techniques, and existing ICAI systems.

Keywords

Natural Language Knowledge Representation Semantic Network Intelligent Tutoring System Student Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gordon I. McCalla
    • 1
  • Jim E. Greer
    • 1
  1. 1.ARIES Laboratory (Advanced Research in Intelligent Educational Systems Lab), Computational Science DepartmentUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

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