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Schooling, Literacy and Cognitive Development: A Study in Rural India

  • J. P. Das
  • U. N. Dash

Abstract

In most of the discussion of schooling and its effect on cognitive competence, the results are based mainly on three types of tasks: standardized intelligence tests (Schmidt, 1960); Piagetian tasks (Greenfield, 1966; Kelly & Philp, 1975); and the tasks derived from laboratory studies (Stevenson, Parker, Wilkinson, Bonnevaux, & Gonzalez, 1978; Wagner, 1974). Despite great diversities in the nature of tasks used, the cultures studied, and the children sampled, considerable consistency has been noted in relating schooling to cognitive competence. It has been shown that schooled children from different cultures perform alike, whereas within the same culture, the performance of the schooled and unschooled children differs both quantitatively and qualitatively (Greenfield, 1966; Stevenson et al., 1978).

Keywords

Standard Deviation Serial Position Color Naming Syllogistic Reasoning Literacy Training 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. Das
    • 1
  • U. N. Dash
    • 2
  1. 1.Developmental Disabilities CentreUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Psychology DepartmentUtkal UniversityBhubaneswarIndia

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