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1H NMR Studies of Genetic Variants and Point Mutants of Myoglobin: Modulation of Distal Steric Tilt of Bound Cyanide Ligand

  • Gerd N. La Mar
  • S. Donald Emerson
  • Krishnakumar Rajarathnam
  • Liping P. Yu
  • Mark Chiu
  • Stephen A. Sligar
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 183)

Abstract

The oxygen-binding sites in the hemoproteins myoglobin, Mb, and hemoglobin, Hb, are considered to have evolved to provide a preferential binding site for the bent geometry of a bound O2 molecule over the linear and perpendicular geometry of a bound CO (Dickerson and Geis, 1983). The preferential affinity of reduced heme iron for CO over O2 in model compounds is modulated in proteins by steric destabilization of the linear Fe-CO unit and stabilization of the bent Fe-OO unit by hydrogen bonding by distal residues (Springer et al., 1989). X-ray structures have demonstrated distorted Fe-CO units in heme proteins (Kuriyan et al., 1986), but the tilt is difficult to characterize quantitatively. While hydrogen-bonding can be inferred from X-ray data by the position of the relevant heteroatoms (Phillips, 1980), the direct observation of the proton requires neutron diffraction (Phillips and Schoenborn, 1981). Functional studies of natural genetic variants (i.e., elephant Mb with E7 His→Gin) (Romero-Herrera et al., 1981) and, more recently, the sperm whale point mutants expressed in E. coli using a synthesized gene (Springer et al., 1989), have generally confirmed the perturbations expected to follow from systematic variations of the E7 residue. However, the details of the stereochemistry in the heme pocket for these variants are not yet known.

Keywords

Magnetic Axis Sperm Whale Heme Pocket Natural Genetic Variant Magnetic Susceptibility Tensor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerd N. La Mar
    • 1
  • S. Donald Emerson
    • 1
  • Krishnakumar Rajarathnam
    • 1
  • Liping P. Yu
    • 1
  • Mark Chiu
    • 2
  • Stephen A. Sligar
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

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