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Oxidative Stress, Poly(ADP)Ribosylation and Aging: In Vitro Studies on Lymphocytes from Normal and Down’s Syndrome Subjects of Different Age and from Patients with Alzheimer’s Dementia

  • C. Franceschi
  • D. Monti
  • A. Cossarizza
  • A. Tomasi
  • P. Sola
  • M. Zannotti
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 264)

Abstract

Free radicals are formed in the body as a consequence of aerobic metabolism. Cells have developed a variety of antioxidant systems, that include classical antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase) as well as nonenzymatic oxy-radicals scavengers (vitamin E, urea, ß-carotene and some more recently described substances such as carnosine) (1). However, a certain fraction of active oxygen species escapes the cellular defence and may cause transient or permanent damage to cellular components. According to one of the most interesting theory of aging is the “free radical theory of aging”, proposed by D. Harman (2) more than thirty years ago, where oxidative damage has been suggested as a major cause of aging. One of the prediction of this theory is an age-related decrease of the efficiency of antioxidant defence mechanisms.

Keywords

Electron Spin Resonance Xanthine Oxidase Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Spin Trapping Free Radical Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Franceschi
    • 1
  • D. Monti
    • 1
  • A. Cossarizza
    • 1
  • A. Tomasi
    • 1
  • P. Sola
    • 2
  • M. Zannotti
    • 3
  1. 1.Istituto di Patologia generaleModenaItaly
  2. 2.Clinica NeurologicaUniversitá di ModenaItaly
  3. 3.Istituto di Istologia ed Embriologia generaleUniversitá di BolognaItaly

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