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Evidence that Calcium Mediates Free Radical Damage Through Activation of Phospholipase A2 During Cold Storage of the Rabbit Kidney

  • Lisa A. Cotterill
  • Jon D. Gower
  • Barry J. Fuller
  • Colin J. Green
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 264)

Abstract

Renal transplantation involves periods of warm and cold ischaemia which often result in poor renal function and death of tubular cells soon after engraftment. There is growing evidence that oxygen derived free radicals are responsible, at least, in part, for reperfusion injury and may be involved in ischaemic damage1. We have shown in previous studies that markers of lipid peroxidation, resulting from oxidative damage, increase in rabbit kidneys following storage2. In addition, we have recently reported evidence for a relationship between altered calcium homeostasis and oxidative damage to the rabbit kidney following cold storage3.

Keywords

Free Fatty Acid Cold Ischaemia Rabbit Kidney Calcium Ionophore A23187 Pentadecanoic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa A. Cotterill
    • 1
  • Jon D. Gower
    • 1
  • Barry J. Fuller
    • 2
  • Colin J. Green
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Surgical ResearchClinical Research Centre HarrowMiddlesexUK
  2. 2.Academic Department of SurgeryRoyal Free Hospital School of MedicineLondonUK

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