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Reperfusion Injury and Renal Metabolism : The Temporal Relationship Between Oxidative Stress and Functional Change

  • B. J. Fuller
  • J. Gower
  • L. Cotterill
  • G. Healing
  • S. Simpkin
  • C. J. Green
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 264)

Abstract

A large number of studies have implicated oxygen-derived free radical (OFR) stress in the pathology of the so-called ‘reperfusion injury’ in a number of organs and tissues including brain (1), liver (2), intestine (3), skin (4), heart (5) and kidney (6). This is the type of injury sustained when an organ has been deprived of blood supply for a period of time, and is then subjected to a sudden restoration of blood supply bringing in high concentrations of oxygen; such events occur in many surgical interventions e.g. during repair of tissues after trauma, and particularly in organ trans- plantation (7).There is growing evidence that OFR scavengers, when introduced under such circumstances, can beneficially influence the outcome of reperfusion (8). However, there is still much debate about the time relationship between OFR events in a tissue and subsequent functional changes, which in turn will influence the timing of administration of any anti-OFR therapy. We have been particularly concerned with reperfusion injury in kidneys (9,10), and the present studies were undertaken to assess renal tissue metabolism (by glueoneogenesis) in rabbit kidneys after ischaemia / reperfusion. Renal cortical tissue gluconeogenesis was chosen as functional test since this is an active process of cortical tubular cells and these cells show characteristic early signs of ischaemia / reperfusion damage as expressed by tubular necrosis.

Keywords

Schiff Base Reperfusion Injury Rabbit Kidney Krebs Ringer Bicarbonate Royal Free Hospital 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. J. Fuller
    • 1
  • J. Gower
    • 2
  • L. Cotterill
    • 2
  • G. Healing
    • 2
  • S. Simpkin
    • 2
  • C. J. Green
    • 2
  1. 1.Academic Department of SurgeryRoyal Free Hospital & School of MedicineLondonUK
  2. 2.Section of Surgical Research, MRC Clinical Research CentreNorthwick Park HospitalHarrowUK

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