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Metabolic Support of Neural Plasticity: Implications for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

  • James E. Black
  • William T. Greenough
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 36)

Abstract

Imagine a “magic bullet” for Alzheimer’s Disease, i.e., a therapy that would do more than just halt the degeneration--this novel treatment would restore the atrophied neocortex and perhaps even replace some of the lost information. Such a glamorous cure for Alzheimer’s disease carries with it a hidden requirement, one that has been relatively neglected in this area of research. The addition of cortical tissue late in life will impose new metabolic demands for synthesis of synaptic connections and the associated dendritic and axonal material. In addition, the volume expansion will tend to dilute metabolic support as the existing capillaries are spread apart. For these reasons any significant restoration of functional cortex will have to include some improvement in its metabolic support.

Keywords

Metabolic Demand Neural Plasticity Complex Experience Standard Cage Neuroscience Abstract 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • James E. Black
    • 1
  • William T. Greenough
    • 1
  1. 1.Beckman Institute, College of Medicine, Departments of Psychology and Cell & Structural Biology, and the Neural & Behavioral Biology ProgramUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA

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