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Real and Perceived Risks of Infection to Health Care Workers: Will Universal Precautions Work? Panel Discussion

  • Kathleen Meehan Arias

Abstract

The members of the panel were Stanley Bauer, M.D. (Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, NY), Robyn Gershon, M.H.S. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD), Martin S. Favero, Ph.D. (Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA), Bruce Kleger, Dr.P.H. (Pennsylvania Department of Health Laboratories, Lionville, PA), and Norman Willett, Ph.D. (Temple University Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Philadelphia, PA). The moderator was Kathleen Meehan Arias, M.S. (Frankford Hospital, Philadelphia, PA).

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Health Care Worker Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Audience Question 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Meehan Arias
    • 1
  1. 1.Infection Control SectionFrankford HospitalPhiladelphiaUSA

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