Advertisement

Introducing New Contraceptive Technologies in Developing Countries

  • Jacqueline Sherris
  • Gordon W. Perkin
Part of the Reproductive Biology book series (RBIO)

Abstract

The successful development and then introduction of a new contraceptive technology onto the market involves a number of interrelated activities. These activities are designed to ensure that the new technology is safe and acceptable to intended users and can be adequately and promptly supplied to users, and that the continuing effectiveness and safety of the technology in a given population can be appropriately monitored. Once a safe and appropriate method has been developed, the major activities involved in contraceptive introduction can be divided into three overall categories: supply, promotion, and surveillance.

Keywords

Family Planning Health Care Worker Local Production Contraceptive Technology Social Marketing Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Free, M.J., R.T. Mahoney, and G.W. Perkin 1984 Transfer of Contraceptive Production Technology to Developing Countries. PIACT paper 9. Seattle, Wash.: Program for the Introduction and Adaptation of Contraceptive Technology.Google Scholar
  2. Fortney, J., and M. Potts 1984 The pill and Asian women. Outlook 2(3):2–4.Google Scholar
  3. Gardner, J.S. 1987 Postmarketing surveillance of pharmaceuticals. Outlook 5(l):2–5.Google Scholar
  4. Hutchings, J., and L. Saunders 1985Assessing the Characteristics and Cost-effectiveness of Contraceptive Methods. PIACT paper 10. Seattle, Wash.: Program for the Introduction and Adaptation of Contraceptive Technology.Google Scholar
  5. Lincoln, R., and L. Kaeser Whatever happened to the contraceptive revolution?Family Planning Perspectives 20(l):20–24.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Sherris, J.D., and G.W. Perkin 1987 Cultural perspectives on contraceptive technology.Technology in Society 9(3/4):323–337.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Sherris, J.D., B.B. Ravenholt, and R. Blackburn 1985 Contraceptive social marketing: Lessons from experience. Population Reports J(3):J-773-J-812.Google Scholar
  8. Zimmerman, M.L., and G.W. Perkin 1982 Print Materials for Nonreaders: Experiences in Family Planning and Health. PIACT paper 8. Seattle, Wash.: Program for the Introduction and Adaptation of Contraceptive Technology.Google Scholar
  9. Zimmerman, M.L., E. Crane, J. Haffrey, and D. Szumowksi The use of focus group research in assessing the acceptability of NORPLANT® implants in four countries. Unpublished internal document, PATH. Seattle, Wash.: Program for Applied Technology in Health.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacqueline Sherris
  • Gordon W. Perkin

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations