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Natural Killer Cell Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the Balb/C Mouse Model

  • J. J. Anderson
  • M. Serin
  • J. Harrop
  • S. Amin
  • G. L. Toms
  • R. Scott
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 257)

Abstract

Infections of the respiratory tract with enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses have become established as common and important causes of infant morbidity. Among these viruses respiratory syncytial (RS) virus is now recognized as the single most common respiratory viral pathogen of infancy (Gardner P.S.,1977). The initial site of virus replication is the respiratory epithelium of the upper nasal passages and the nasopharynx, but in certain instances, the virus spreads to the lower respiratory tract infecting the bronchial and bronchiolar epithelia as well as cells of the pulmonary parenchyma (Aherne et a1;1970). RS virus therefore causes a variety of respiratory illnesses, which vary in severity from mild febrile upper respiratory tract disease to severe acute bronchiolitis, bronchitis, pneumonia and croup. The more severe forms of illness however are largely confined to infants less than 12 months of age and regular annual winter epidemics of RS virus infection in this age group have been reported throughout the temperate regions of the world.

Keywords

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Lung Lavage Natural Killer Cell Response Lung Lymphocyte 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. J. Anderson
    • 1
  • M. Serin
    • 1
  • J. Harrop
    • 1
  • S. Amin
    • 1
  • G. L. Toms
    • 1
  • R. Scott
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of VirologyUniversity of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical SchoolNewcaste Upon TyneUK

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