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Worldwide Public and Occupational Radiofrequency and Microwave Protection Guides

  • Martino Grandolfo
  • Kjell Hansson Mild

Abstract

Efforts to establish a scientific data base for setting radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) standards mark their 36th anniversary this year. In April 1953, a conference was held in Bethesda, Maryland, to assess the state of scientific knowledge on RF/MW bioeffects. At the time, the relevant scientific literature numbered less than 100 items, and the scientists assembled at the meeting called for more research, setting in motion the RF/MW bioeffects research effort that has been ongoing, with varying degrees of intensity, ever since.

Keywords

Magnetic Field Strength Specific Absorption Rate Occupational Exposure Limit Radiofrequency Radiation Nonionizing Radiation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martino Grandolfo
    • 1
  • Kjell Hansson Mild
    • 2
  1. 1.National Institute of HealthPhysics Laboratory and INFN-Sezione Sanita’RomeItaly
  2. 2.National Institute of Occupational HealthUmeaSweden

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