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Three-Dimensional Displays and Plots of Anatomic Structures

  • Joseph J. Capowski

Abstract

This chapter presents methods for producing (“rendering” in computer graphics technology) displays and plots of anatomic structures that have already been entered into the computer. The goal is to generate views of the structure as they would have appeared naturally, before any tissue sectioning or other histological manipulations are performed. Since most of the structures are microscopic and a microscope imposes viewing constraints on its user, a display must actually present a view that is better than you could see if you looked into the microscope yourself.

Keywords

Computer Graphic Graphic System Laser Printer Frame Buffer Vector Display 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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For Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph J. Capowski
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Eutectic Electronics, Inc.RaleighUSA
  2. 2.The University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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