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Fully Automatic Neuron Tracing

  • Joseph J. Capowski

Abstract

Tamas Freund, a friend from Budapest, wrote me a letter in 1981 in which he said, “Joe, you should build the ultimate neuron-tracing system. In the afternoon, an anatomist will put his microscope slide in it and go to a local pub and drink a beer. The next morning when he returns to the lab, the neuron will be reconstructed, the analysis will be done, and the paper will be written. This would be the perfect neuron-tracing system.” I answered Tamas’ letter with “Thank you for your insight and we’ll get right on it.” Well, we’ve been getting right on it since 1974, and we’re nowhere near it.

Keywords

Gray Level Branch Point Tube Face Voxel Representation Thick Dendrite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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For Further Reading

  1. Garvey, C. F., J. Young, W. Simon, and P. D. Coleman (1972). Semiautomatic dendrite tracking and focusing by computer. Anat. Rec. 172: 314.Google Scholar
  2. Garvey, C. F., J. Young, W. Simon, and P. D. Coleman (1973). Automated three-dimensional dendrite tracking system. Electroencephalogr. Clin. Neurophysiol. 35: 199–204.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Reddy, D. R., W. J. Davis, R. B. Ohlander, and D. J. Bihary (1973). Computer analysis of neuronal structure. In: Intracellular Staining in Neurobiology ( S. B. Kater and C. Nicholson, eds.). New York: Springer-Verlag, pp. 227–253.Google Scholar
  4. Llinas, R., and D. E. Hillman (1975). A multipurpose tridimensional reconstruction computer system for neuroanatomy. In: Golgi Centennial Symposium Proceedings (M. Santini, ed.). New York: Raven Press, pp. 71–79.Google Scholar
  5. Hillman, D. E. (1976). A tridimensional reconstruction computer system for neuroanatomy. Comput. Med. 5 (6): 1–2.Google Scholar
  6. Hillman, D. E., R. Llinas, and M. Chujo (1977). Automatic and semiautomatic analysis of nervous system structure. In: Computer Analysis of Neuronal Structures ( R. D. Lindsay, ed.). New York: Plenum Press, pp. 73–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Capowski, J. J. (1983a). An automatic neuron reconstruction system. J. Neurosci. Methods 8 (4): 353–364.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Reuman, S. R., and J. J. Capowski (1984). Automated neuron tracing using the Marr-Hildreth zerocrossing technique. Comput. Biomed. Res. 17: 93–115.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Coleman, P. D., C. F. Garvey, J. H. Young, and W. Simon (1977). Semiautomatic tracing of neuronal processes. In: Computer Analysis of Neuronal Structures ( R. D. Lindsay, ed.). New York: Plenum Press, pp. 91–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Buell, S. J., and P. D. Coleman (1979). Dendritic growth in the aged human brain and failure of growth in senile dementia. Science 206: 854–856.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Hogan, R. N., and P. D. Coleman (1981). Experimental hyperphenylalaninemia: Dendritic in motor cortex of rat. Exp. Neurol. 74: 218–233.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Wallen, P., K. Carlsson, A. Liljeborg, and S. Grillner (1988). Three-dimensional reconstruction of neurons in the lamprey spinal cord in whole-mount, using a confocal laser scaning microscope. J. Neurosci. Methods 24: 91–100.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph J. Capowski
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Eutectic Electronics, Inc.RaleighUSA
  2. 2.The University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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