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Analysis of Molecular Structure of Rat Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate Synthetase Genes

  • Masamiti Tatibana
  • Masanori Taira
  • Sumio Ishijima
  • Kazuko Kita
  • Hideaki Shimada
  • Kazumi Yamada
  • Taizo Iizasa
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 253A)

Abstract

Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase catalyzes the formation of PRPP by a pyrophosphoryl transfer from ATP to ribose 5-phosphate. The enzyme has been purified from bacteria [1, 2] and mammalian tissues [3, 4], The mammalian enzyme exists in many active forms of various molecular mass [5], reportedly composed of subunits of 31, 000–40, 500 daltons [1–4], However, our recent results showed that rat liver PRPP synthetase exists as complex aggregates of 34-kDa, 38-kDa, and 40-kDa components and the 34-kDa species is the catalytic subunit (K. Kita et al., this volume). We then carried out cDNA cloning of rat enzyme [6] in order to determine the primary structure and also to proceed to studies of gene regulation. We here describe unpublished details of part of the cloning experiments and preliminary accounts of analysis of rat genomic genes.

Keywords

Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Tryptic Peptide Phage Vector Southern Blot Technique PRPP Synthetase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masamiti Tatibana
    • 1
  • Masanori Taira
    • 1
  • Sumio Ishijima
    • 1
  • Kazuko Kita
    • 1
  • Hideaki Shimada
    • 1
  • Kazumi Yamada
    • 1
  • Taizo Iizasa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryChiba University School of MedicineInohana, Chiba 280Japan

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