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The Activity of AA-193, A New Uricosuric Agent, in Animals

  • Takashi Dan
  • Hiroshi Koga
  • Etsuro Onuma
  • Haruko Tanaka
  • Haruhiko Sato
  • Bunya Aoki
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 253A)

Summary

A new uricosuric agent, 5-chloro-7, 8-dihydro-3-phenylfuro[2, 3-g]-1, 2-benzisoxazole-7-carboxylic acid (AA–193), was compared with other uricosurics in the rat, mouse and cebus monkey.

In rats, probenecid and tienilic acid increased the urate excretion, but benzbromarone did not have the uricosuric activity. Thus, the presecretory reabsorption of urate is probably dominant in rats. We found that in rats AA–193 was the most potent uricosuric tested. Tn mice, probenecid not only had so-called paradoxical actions but stimulated urinary urate wasting after administration of pyrazinamide. These data suggest that the renal transport system of urate in the mouse is similar to that in man. AA–193 as well as benzbromarone enhanced the urate excretion dose-dependently, but the effects were different in pyrazinamide suppression tests in mice. In cebus monkeys, the uricosuric and hypouricemic effects of AA–193 were more potent than those of probenecid and similar to those of tienilic acid, but less than those of benzbromarone. Benzbromarone had a considerable role in postsecretory reabsorption in the monkey.

These results suggest that AA–193 is a new class of uricosuric agent that controls the renal reabsorption of filtered urate particularly.

Keywords

Uric Acid Paradoxical Effect Tienilic Acid Renal Reabsorption Cebus Monkey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takashi Dan
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Koga
    • 1
  • Etsuro Onuma
    • 1
  • Haruko Tanaka
    • 1
  • Haruhiko Sato
    • 1
  • Bunya Aoki
    • 1
  1. 1.Fuji Gotemba Research Laboratories Gotemba-shiChugai Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.Shizuoka 412Japan

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