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Biodeterioration of Man-Made Textiles in Various Soil Environments

  • Sandra M. Singer
  • Walter F. Rowe

Abstract

According to the Locard Exchange Principle, when two surfaces come into contact there will be an exchange of material across the contact face. This material is generally referred to as trace evidence. Trace evidence can include fragments of broken glass, soil material, paint, hair, clothing fibers or any other type of material that the perpetrator of a crime leaves at the scene or carries away with him. In criminal cases, this evidence is commonly used as a means of associating a suspect with the victim scene of the crime (DeForest et al., 1983).

Keywords

Cellulose Acetate Urban Soil Textile Fiber Federal Bureau Cellulose Triacetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra M. Singer
    • 1
  • Walter F. Rowe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forensic SciencesThe George Washington UniversityUSA

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