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Cilia Polymorphism among Schistosome Snail Hosts as Revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy

  • Betty R. Jones
  • D. Prewitt
  • J. Hicks
  • C. Nelson

Abstract

Finding a suitable and susceptible snail host is one of the most important functions of Schistosome miracidia (Chernin, 1974; Pan, 1980). A number of behavior type studies have been carried out on Schistosoma mansoni miracidia utilizing simple quantitative and biochemical assays in relation to host-finding (Chernin, 1962, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972).

Keywords

Lower Mantle Schistosoma Mansoni Mouth Region Snail Host Amyl Acetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Betty R. Jones
    • 1
  • D. Prewitt
    • 1
  • J. Hicks
    • 1
  • C. Nelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology, Parasitology and Electron Microscopy Laboratory and Atlanta University Center Scanning Electron Microscopy Research LaboratoryMorehouse CollegeAtlantaUSA

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