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Occurrence of Bright Greenish Yellow-Fluorescing Spots Associated with Aspergillus Flavus Infection in Fiber of the U.S. Cotton Crop of 1987

  • Marion E. Simpson
  • Paul B. Marsh

Abstract

An account from USDA-Beltsville in 1954 reported that fiber in rotted bolls from Blythe, California exhibited a bright greenish yellow fluorescence under ultra violet light and that the fluorescing fiber was infected with the fungus Aspergillus flavus (Bollenbacher and Marsh, 1954). Subsequently, a survey of commercial fiber from the U.S. cotton crop of 1957 for fluorescing spots of this hue showed that the fluorescence phenomenon was geographically localized in the crop of that year (Marsh and Taylor, 1958). It was especially frequent in samples from El Centro in the Imperial Valley of southern California, Phoenix, Arizona, and Harlingen in southern Texas. Fluorescing spots could also be seen in samples from other parts of Texas but with lesser frequency. It was rarely found in the San Joaquin Valley of California and infrequently in samples from the Mid-south and Southeast. Because of the bright greenish yellow color of the fluorescing spots, they were referred to in our laboratory as “BGY spots”.

Keywords

Cotton Fiber Cotton Seed Kojic Acid Cotton Crop Cotton Boll 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marion E. Simpson
    • 1
  • Paul B. Marsh
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research ServiceBeltsvilleUSA

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