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Separation of Organelles and Membranes by Phase Partitioning — A Short Overview

  • C. Larsson

Abstract

Disintegration of animal or plant tissue results in a complex mixture of intact organelles and membrane vesicles. To obtain a homogeneous preparation of a certain organelle or membrane is, therefore, usually a very demanding task, particularly since the organelles we want should not only be morphologically intact but also fully active, and the membrane vesicles should not only be homogeneous with respect to origin (including domains) but also with respect to orientation (sidedness), and, in addition, retain their activities. To fulfil these demands we can usually not rely on one method only but have to combine different methods separating according to different properties of the particles. This makes two-phase partitioning an extremely attractive method since it separates particles according to differences in surface properties [1], and therefore complements differential and gradient centrifugation which separate according to size and density.

Keywords

Polymer Concentration Membrane Vesicle Plasma Membrane Vesicle Countercurrent Distribution Chloroplast Thylakoid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Larsson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant PhysiologyUniversity of LundLundSweden

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