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Demixing Kinetics of Phase Separated Polymer Solutions in Microgravity

  • S. Bamberger
  • D. E. Brooks
  • J. M. Van Alstine
  • J. M. Harris
  • R. S. Snyder

Abstract

The efficiency of particle separation in polymer two-phase systems appears to be up to several orders of magnitude lower than theoretical estimations based on Boltzmann statistics. To test the hypothesis that this inefficiency is at least partially due to the convection and sedimentation that occur during gravity-driven demixing we have begun a series of experiments aimed at characterising particle partitions in space. The one-g demixing of systems possessing equal densities has been studied. We have also studied the demixing of PEG/dextran systems in low gravity on KC-135 aircraft and during one Shuttle mid-deck experiment. The demixing rate data from these experiments have been analysed by two different approaches. In both cases the results are consistent with coalescence being a dominant feature of the gravity-free demixing process.

Keywords

Interfacial Tension Phase Droplet Phase Volume Ratio Phase Viscosity Boltzmann Equilibrium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Bamberger
    • 1
  • D. E. Brooks
    • 2
  • J. M. Van Alstine
    • 1
  • J. M. Harris
    • 3
  • R. S. Snyder
    • 1
  1. 1.Space Science LaboratoryNASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, ES76USA
  2. 2.Departments of Pathology and ChemistryUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryUniversity of AlabamaHuntsvilleUSA

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