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Protein Transport Processes in the Water-Water Interface in Incompatible Two Phase Systems

  • M. P. Tombs
  • S. E. Harding

Abstract

Proteins, such as ovalbumin, albumin, cytochrome C or a chromobacter lipase were added to either the upper or lower phase of a PEG 6000, Dextran T500 system, and the phases placed carefully in contact. Diffusion processes and interfacial accumulation were then observed by using the optical scanning system of an MSE Centriscan ultracentrifuge run at low speeds. The overall process was one of simple diffusion, though in such complex systems movement up the protein concentration gradient can occur and was observed. Interfacial accumulation roughly in accord with expectation based on a simple interfacial tension theory was also seen.

Keywords

Hyaluronic Acid Lower Phase Hydrostatic Pressure Difference Interfacial Accumulation Aqueous Phase System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. P. Tombs
    • 1
  • S. E. Harding
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Biochemistry and Food ScienceUniversity of NottinghamSutton Bonington, LoughboroughUK

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