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Effects of Different Inspiratory/Expiratory (I/E) Ratios and Peep-Ventilation on Blood Gases and Hemodynamics in Dogs with Severe Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS)

  • B. Lachmann
  • W. Schairer
  • S. Armbruster
  • G. J. van Daal
  • W. Erdmann
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 248)

Abstract

Despite great advances in the treatment of acute respiratory failure, many patients do not respond to accepted methods of resuscitation. The great majority of these critically ill patients fall into the category of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).The main immediate therapeutic goal in severe ARDS consists of attempting to overcome hypoxaemia as well as metabolic and respiratory acidosis by means of respiratory therapy, increased inspiratory oxygen concentration and infusion of buffer solution. Some patients, who showed no improvement from this therapeutic regiment, have been treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) (1) or with extracorporeal elimination of CO2 (2) in combination with low frequency ventilation in a few highly specialized intensive care units.

Keywords

Acute Respiratory Failure Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Inspiratory Time High Peep 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Lachmann
    • 1
  • W. Schairer
    • 1
  • S. Armbruster
    • 1
  • G. J. van Daal
    • 1
  • W. Erdmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of AnesthesiologyErasmus UniversityRotterdamThe Netherlands

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