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Muscle O2 Uptake While Perfused at Constant Pressure with Normoxic Blood During Global Hypoxia

  • K. Reinhart
  • D. L. Bredle
  • C. K. Chapler
  • S. M. Cain
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 248)

Abstract

When the isolated hindlimb muscles of anesthetized dogs were perfused at constant flow (CF) with normoxic blood while the whole animal was ventilated with 9% O2 in N2, limb O2 uptake (VO2) increased 25% instead of decreasing with whole body VO2 (Bredle et al., 1988a). This hypoxia-induced increase in limb O2 demand was attributed to the calorigenic effects of catecholamines liberated at sympathetic nerve endings and from the adrenal medulla as a result of increased chemoreceptor activity during hypoxia (Blatteis and Lutherer, 1974; Cain, 1969; Sylvester et al., 1979). The increase in hindlimb VO2 was prevented by β2-adrenergic receptor blockade (Bredle et al., 1988a) and was largely dependent on intact innervation to the hindlimb (Bredle et al., 1988b). Our goal in the present study was two-fold: 1) to ascertain whether hypoxic vasoconstrictor tone was sufficiently potent to prevent any increase in limb VO2 even if it were perfused with normoxic blood, and 2) to observe whether any autoregulatory escape would occur if that were the case. With respect to the second goal, as the ratio of O2 supply to demand decreases, then local vasodilator factors should accumulate to relieve local vasoconstriction (Cain and Chapler, 1979). To accomplish these goals, we pump-perfused the limb muscles of anesthetized dogs with normoxic blood at constant perfusion pressure (CP) while ventilating them with an hypoxic gas mixture. In this manner, blood flow varied inversely with the level of sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone.

Keywords

Hindlimb Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Ending Vasoconstrictor Tone Succinylcholine Chloride Constant Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Reinhart
    • 1
  • D. L. Bredle
    • 1
  • C. K. Chapler
    • 2
  • S. M. Cain
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Physiology and BiophysicsUniv. of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Dept. of PhysiologyQueen’s Univ.KingstonCanada

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