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Influences of Different Routinely Used Muscle Relaxants on Oxygen Delivery to and Oxygen Consumption by the Heart During Xenon-Anesthesia

  • L. J. van Woerkens
  • B. Lachmann
  • G. J. van Daal
  • W. Schairer
  • R. Tenbrinck
  • P. D. Verdouw
  • W. Erdmann
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 248)

Abstract

To date there are no known studies in which the influence of routinely used muscle relaxants on the heart metabolism were studied, avoiding the cardiodepressive effects of halothane in combination with nitrous oxide or fentanyl (1,2,3). In earlier investigations we have shown Xenon to be an effective anesthetic gas with potent analgesic properties. Further on we could demonstrate that Xenon anesthesia has virtually no side-effects on cardiocirculatory parameters (4,5). Therefore it is possible to study the influence of different muscle relaxants on cardiac metabolism, without interaction with other anesthetics.

Keywords

Mean Arterial Pressure Muscle Relaxant Great Cardiac Vein Radioactive Microsphere Cardiodepressive Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. J. van Woerkens
    • 2
  • B. Lachmann
    • 1
  • G. J. van Daal
    • 1
  • W. Schairer
    • 1
  • R. Tenbrinck
    • 1
  • P. D. Verdouw
    • 2
  • W. Erdmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Erasmus UniversityRotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Depts. of Anesthesiology and Experimental CardiologyThorax CentreRotterdamThe Netherlands

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