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Determination of Cerebral Venous Hemoglobin Saturation by Derivative Near Infrared Spectrosocpy

  • Marco Ferrari
  • David A. Wilson
  • Daniel F. Hanley
  • Jean F. Hartmann
  • Richard J. Traystman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 248)

Abstract

A non invasive measure of brain tissue hemoglobin saturation could prove more useful than a systemic measure, since it reflects the balance between O2 delivery and O2 consumption and is organ specific. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was developed to monitor changes in brain hemodynamics and O2 utilization (Jobsis, 1977; Wyatt et al., 1986; Ferrari et al., 1987). Quantification of the NIRS data has been difficult, therefore a new method was developed to quantitatively measure cerebral oxygenation using derivative NIRS (DNIRS), a secondary measurement method, which is calibrated to a primary conventional analytical method (Williams and Norris, 1987). DNIRS has been extensively applied in agriculture and its calibration involves establishing a mathematical relationship between the optical information and the primary species of interest. By using derivative spectra, scattering and non-specific absorption can be minimized while selection for the chromophores of interest can be optimized. This derivative method, well known in “in vitro” biochemistry, could be applied “in vivo” taking into account optical properties of the near IR transilluminated brain tissue and meninges (Wilson and Patterson, 1986; Eggert and Blazeck, 1987).

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Volume Near Infrared Spectroscopy Derivative Spectrum Hemoglobin Saturation Hypoxic Hypoxia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marco Ferrari
    • 1
  • David A. Wilson
    • 3
  • Daniel F. Hanley
    • 3
  • Jean F. Hartmann
    • 3
  • Richard J. Traystman
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical Sciences and TechnologyBiometrics University of L’AquilaL’AquilaItaly
  2. 2.Physiopathology Laboratory, Istituto Superiore di SanitaRomeItaly
  3. 3.Department of Anesthesiology/Critical Care MedicineThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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