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Muscle Fiber Size and Chronic Exposure to Hypoxia

  • Odile Mathieu-Costello
  • David C. Poole
  • Richard B. Logemann
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 248)

Abstract

Fiber size is an important variable to consider when estimating several aspects of the geometry of peripheral tissue gas exchange. It directly affects diffusion and intercapillary distances, capillary density (often estimated as capillary counts per fiber cross-sectional area, capillary/ mm2 of fiber), and capillary-to-fiber perimeter ratio.

Keywords

Capillary Number Sarcomere Length Fiber Size Deer Mouse Muscle Fiber Size 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Odile Mathieu-Costello
    • 1
  • David C. Poole
    • 1
  • Richard B. Logemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, M-023AUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA

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