Advertisement

Spatial Distribution of Coronary Capillaries: A-V Segment Staggering

  • S. Batra
  • C. Kuo
  • K. Rakusan
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 248)

Abstract

The modelling of oxygen transport to tissue necessitates a concerted effort in linking structural and functional data. In our laboratory, we are interested in the geometrical distribution of coronary capillaries. Traditionally, capillary supply has been characterized only by measures of capillary density, from which it is possible to calculate average inter-capillary distance (ICD). The deficiency in such a calculation is the assumption of a uniform distribution of capillaries. The heterogeneity of inter-capillary spacing is clearly an important factor in myocardial oxygenation, over and above average ICD. Methods for assessing the heterogeneity of capillary spacing, and it’s effect on myocardial oxygenation have been recently analyzed (Rakusan and Turek, 1985 and Turek et. al., 1987). Another important parameter for modelling oxygen transport is the knowledge of the direction of blood flow in adjacent capillaries. Our recent application of coloured microspheres, for the analysis of myocardial flow pattern, revealed a predominance of concurrent flow in neighboring capillaries (Reeves and Rakusan, 1987). Nonetheless, a uniformity in flow direction does not ensure that the spatial position and P02 values of neighboring capillaries are synchronous. One may envision a situation where the transverse arteriole furnishes capillaries at staggered levels in the tissue.

Keywords

Venous Side Capillary Spacing Terminal Arteriole Individual Capillary Adjacent Capillary 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cliff, A.D., Ord, J.K., 1973, Spatial Autocorrelation. Pion., London. Lojda, Z., 1979, Studies on Dipeptidyl(Amino)Peptidase IV (Glycyl-Proline Naphthylamidase. Histochemistry. 59:153–166.Google Scholar
  2. Mrazkova, O., Grim, M., Carlson, B.M., 1986, Enzymatic Heterogeneity of the Capillary Bed of Rat Skeletal Muscles. Amer. J. Anat. 177:141–148.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Rakusan, K., Turek, Z., 1985, The effect of heterogeneity of capillary spacing and O2 consumption-blood flow mismatching on myocardial oxygenation of cardiac muscle. in: Oxygen Transport to Tissue-VII. Eds. F. Kreuzer, S.M. Cain, Z. Turek, T.K. Goldstick, Plenum Press, New York and London, pp. 257–261.Google Scholar
  4. Reeves, W.J., Rakusan, K., 1988, Myocardial Capillary Flow Pattern as Determined by the method of Coloured Microspheres. in: Oxygen Transport to Tissue-X. Eds. M. Mochizuki, C.R. Honig, T. Koyama, T.K. Goldstick, and D.F. Bruley, Plenum Press, New York and London, pp. 447–453.Google Scholar
  5. Turek, Z., Hoofd, L., Rakusan, K., 1987, A comparison of the methods for assessment of the heterogeneity of myocardial capillary spacing. in: Oxygen Transport to Tissue-IX. Eds. I.A. Silver and A. Silver, Plenum Press, New York and London, pp.13–19.Google Scholar
  6. Venema, H.W., 1988, Spatial Distribution of Fiber Types in Skeletal Muscle: Test for a Random Distribution. Muscle & Nerve II:301–311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Batra
    • 1
  • C. Kuo
    • 1
  • K. Rakusan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada

Personalised recommendations