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Po2 Histograms in Various Models of Tissue Oxygenation in Skeletal Muscle

  • Zdenek Turek
  • Jos Olders
  • Louis Hoofd
  • Stuart Egginton
  • Ferdinand Kreuzer
  • Karel Rakusan
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 248)

Abstract

A natural way of testing mathematical models is to compare them with experimental results. Until recently, the most common experimental results on tissue oxygenation were in the form of Po2 histograms obtained with surface or needle Po2 electrodes. In recent years Po2 histograms derived from myoglobin cryospectrophotometry were presented for skeletal (Honig, 1984; Gayeski et al., 1985; Gayeski and Honig, 1986; Gayeski and Honig, 1988) and cardiac muscle (Honig and Gayeski, 1987). It came as a great surprise that the Po2 histograms derived from myoglobin saturation measured by myoglobin cryospectrophotometry were different from those obtained with the electrodes, having a very high percentage of low Po2 values even at rest. In stimulated skeletal muscle or in the beating heart a great majority of the Po2 values were lower than 10 mm Hg. An additional resistance operating near the capillary wall was suggested as an explanation for these results. Similar additional resistance in the capillary wall has been also proposed by Rose and Goresky (1985). This would be expected to result in hypoxia of a high percentage of tissue if only a diffusion of physically dissolved O2 is considered. Honig and Gayeski proposed that the diffusion of O2 facilitated by myoglobin might be the mechanism that compensates for this danger so efficiently that the Po2 profiles become very low and flat, but higher than zero. This was supported by theoretical analysis indicating that the facilitation of O2 diffusion by myoglobin can compensate for the effect of an additional resistance when average size of a muscle fiber was considered (Federspiel, 1986; Gayeski and Honig, 1986; Groebe and Thews, 1986).

Keywords

Oxygen Transport Flow Type Beating Heart Additional Resistance Flow Heterogeneity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zdenek Turek
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jos Olders
    • 1
    • 2
  • Louis Hoofd
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stuart Egginton
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ferdinand Kreuzer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Karel Rakusan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Depts. of PhysiologyCatholic University of NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.University of BirminghamBirminghamUK
  3. 3.University of OttawaOttawaCanada

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