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Hair Cell Mechanics Controls the Dynamic Behaviour of the Lateral Line Cupula

  • Sietse M. van Netten
  • Alfons B. A. Kroese
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA)

Abstract

The direct stimulus for vertebrate sensory hair cells is, in general, provided by fluid surrounded macrostructures that are coupled mechanically to the hair bundles. The dynamic behaviour of these accessory structures is determined by their hydrodynamic and mechanical characteristics. A considerable part of the mechanical suspension of these structures is probably provided by the hair bundles. The micromechanical properties of the hair cells are therefore thought to contribute significantly to the mechanical characteristics of these accessory structures and to influence their motion (Khanna and Leonard, 1982; Flock and Strelioff, 1984; Strelioff et al., 1984). In the mammalian cochlea, for instance, hair cell properties are assumed to be responsible for the sharp tuning of the basilar membrane (Khanna and Leonard, 1986).

Keywords

Hair Cell Lateral Line Accessory Structure Hair Bundle Sensory Hair Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sietse M. van Netten
    • 1
    • 3
  • Alfons B. A. Kroese
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Otolaryngology, College of Physicians and SurgeonsColumbia University New YorkNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medical PhysicsUniversity of Amsterdam, Academic Medical CenterAZ AmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Biophysics, Laboratory for General PhysicsUniversity of GroningenCM GroningenThe Netherlands

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