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Time-Domain Solutions for 1D, 2D and 3D Cochlear Models

  • Rob J. Diependaal
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA)

Abstract

The field of mathematical modeling of cochlear mechanics has shifted its focus towards nonlinear and active processes. Arguments for modeling the cochlea as a nonlinear system have been given by recent observations of the presence of nonlinear behavior at a mechanical level [13, 14, 12, 16, 15]. The inclusion of active features in descriptions of cochlear functioning is motivated by measurements of acoustic emissions (pioneered by Kemp [9]), which are shown to be the result of an (unstable) active filtering process rather than being filtered noise [2]. Moreover, calculations on cochlear models [1, 17, 3] strongly suggest that this activity is responsible for the sharp tuning of the recently measured basilar membrane (BM) vibration data [10, 16, 15]. However, the presence of activity at the BM level has not been proven beyond all doubt [18, 11].

Keywords

Acoustic Emission Basilar Membrane Tone Burst Characteristic Place Limit Cycle Amplitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rob J. Diependaal
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Mathematics and InformaticsDelft University of TechnologyAJ DelftThe Netherlands

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